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Monday, July 31, 2017

Coloring Embossed Metal Jewelry Components (Part 2) - Tutorial


Metal earring components - embossed, cut out, painted and riveted.


I don't know about you, but it seems that when I work on my jewelry designs, I tend to do so in an assembly line fashion.  Overall, it saves me time in completing several projects, however, it also takes awhile for my finished pieces to come to fruition.

True to form, I have several pieces of metal embossed and painted for up and coming jewelry designs; several of these are still waiting to be incorporated into necklaces, earrings and bracelets.  For this blog post, I want to share some pictures of my process with you.  I hope it helps to get your creative juices flowing.

The designs shown in the first picture of this post show earrings components that I riveted together. I embossed metal pieces, cut them out, sanded the edges, domed the "flower" pieces, painted them and riveted them together.  (I used 22 and 24 gauge metal pieces, in case you were wondering.  :) )

For this post, I will focus on the earring components shown in the upper right hand corner.  First, I embossed my metal, then I cut it into the desired shapes (circles) and sanded the edges.  I also punched holes in the spots where I want to attach my flowers with rivets. These pieces will serve as the base of the earrings.

Embossed, cut, sanded and punched metal pieces - these will serve as the base of the earrings.

I painted the metal circles with Vintaj Patina colors (Verdigris, Marine and a touch of Onyx around the edges.)  After painting, I sanded over the tops of the bases to give them extra depth.

Painted metal earring bases.



 Next, I took metal flower stampings and punched holes in the center of each flower.  I then domed each one with a dapping block set.  The flowers were painted in complementary colors with Vintaj Patina paints and alcohol inks, as shown in the photos below.

Painted metal flowers.
Painted metal flowers.  



Last, but certainly not least, I attached the flowers to the round metal bases with rivets.  The rivets, which serve as the centers of the flowers, were also painted to complement the overall design.

Wa-la! The assembled design!

The assembled design.


 As an added bonus, I want to show you the earring components (before and after assembly) of another pair of soon-to-be earrings:

Painted metal pieces prior to assembly.

Metal pieces after assembly.

In my next blog post, I will share several completed painted metal jewelry designs.  Please be sure to check back regularly!  "See" you soon!


Sunday, July 9, 2017

Coloring Embossed Metal Jewelry Components (Part 1) - Sunflowers DIY

Sunflower (metal) jewelry components - cut, colored and sanded.

Long before it became all of the rage to color metal jewelry components, I used to color my metal jewelry pieces with things such as Sharpie markers and acrylic paint.  I would then seal the pieces with a glaze to make them more durable for everyday wear.

These days, it's much easier to color jewelry components, particularly metal, thanks to products like Vintaj Patina for Metal and Tim Holtz's Adirondack Alcohol Inks (both are products of Ranger Ink.)  Recently, I had the chance to experiment with these products - in combination with some others - on some of my metal jewelry creations. The products alone are fun to work with, but they take on a whole different level when they are mixed together and used with other paints on the market.  Due to the sheer number of items I created that I will be sharing here, this topic will be split into two blog posts.  (Please be sure to come back later and check out the second post.)

I will be heading to Europe this fall, visiting Italy, Germany and France.  (It is my gift to myself for graduating "with high distinction" from college this past May.) :)  One of the things that always reminds me of Italy are sunflowers which are so prevalent in the fields of Tuscany.  That inspired me to make some sunflower-themed jewelry components.   The set shown below is one that I have made for myself.  The larger center piece will be made into a long, boho-style necklace; the smaller pieces will be made into matching earrings.  I plan to wear these on my upcoming vacation.



Since I was on a roll making sunflower-themed pieces, I thought it would be fun to share my process here with others who may be interested in trying this technique.  The pictorial below is for sunflower earring components.  I cut out two oval shapes from Bead Landing's pre-embossed metal sheets I purchased at Michael's.  (Of course, you can always emboss your metal yourself in order to create a truly one-of-a-kind piece of jewelry art.) I punched holes in the top for the ear wires, as well.

I used the sunflower sheet shown at the bottom of the package to make the jewelry designs.




First, with a small  paintbrush, I strategically colored my metal pieces with Adirondack Acrylic Paints in the colors Sunshine Yellow and Red Pepper.  (Don't worry about being messy; the pieces will be sanded at the end and the look will come together.)


I took Vintaj Metal Patina in the color Earth and dabbed on the color outside of the sunflowers and around the edge of the components to make them pop.


This is a close-up of how they look after the Patina was applied:


I applied a light touch of Butterscotch alcohol ink to the flowers to give them a golden glow and to add depth to the image.


I dabbed Vintaj Patina in Rust to the center of the flowers.


With a very dry paintbrush, I picked up a little Vintaj Patina in Onyx and applied it sparingly to the center of the flowers.

The painted components before sanding.




Last, I brushed a light coat of Vintaj Glaze over the top of both pieces and let them dry.  Once dried, I sanded the tops and sides of the painted pieces with a fine grit sandpaper.  As you can see, this really adds texture to the design. Simply gorgeous!


Completed pieces - painted, glazed and sanded.



I will be sharing other metal component designs in Part 2 of this topic later this month.  Please come back and join me at that time. I'd love to have you visit me here in blog land.  And as always, please don't forget to join me on Instagram, where I often share pictures of jewelry projects in process.  "See" you soon!




Sunday, January 15, 2017

Pebeo Fantasy Paint Jewelry

Pebeo Catholic Jewelry by Wanda Maria Designs.


I recently became addicted to Pebeo's fantasy paint, particularly the Prisme version.  I "discovered" it in the clearance section of my local Hobby Lobby store.  After pouring through the pamphlets in the area regarding this paint, I was amazed that I did not know about this magical paint before.  How is that possible?  I'm not sure what the situation was concerning the paint, however, on the Facebook Pebeo group page which I belong to, someone mentioned that Hobby Lobby was clearing it out because of lack of interest/ineffective marketing.  I'm not sure how true that is, that's just what I found out through the online rumor mill.  Since my initial discovery and purchase of this paint, I have purchased several additional bottles online and from a local art store in my area.

I have been experimenting with applying different color combinations of this paint on different materials, such as on metal, glass, wood, stone and other things.  One thing is certain - regardless of which colors I use - the designs and patterns which form within the paint as it dries are simply beautiful and interesting.  I added a coat of resin over the top of the paint on the jewelry pieces in order to better preserve them during wear.

Below are some of the jewelry items I have made using cross bezels I had on hand; the images were borrowed from my Instagram page:

Pebeo Catholic Jewelry by Wanda Maria Designs

Pebeo Catholic Jewelry by Wanda Maria Designs

Pebeo Catholic Jewelry by Wanda Maria Designs

There are additional pieces I have made which I have yet to make into completed jewelry designs.  I hope to share more photographs here as I complete those pieces, as well as other new designs.  Be sure to check back here for upcoming posts on my latest polymer clay jewelry pieces and how to market/package jewelry pieces on a budget.